A Writer’s Garden–Memories Are Part of A Garden’s Treasures by Carol Ann Moleti

Thanks so much for having me, Catherine>

Catherine Castle

Welcome to A Writer’s Garden where writers who are gardeners or just love gardens will be sharing their garden and flower stories, as well as a bit about their writing gardens—aka their books.

 Today’s guest writer/gardener is Carole Ann Moleti. Carole will be talking about Gardens and Memories. Welcome, Carole!

Memories are Part of a Gardens Treasure

 

Gardens never forget their gardeners past. Secrets are buried, and sometimes never unearthed, or trampled by someone who doesn’t understand or care about their significance. But the garden will speak its truths and tributes to those willing to listen.

The seventh anniversary of my father’s death was June 11, and I spent the entire month before tending his garden. For as long as I can remember, I’d followed Daddy around as he planted flowers and vegetables, fertilized rosebushes with dead fish he hadn’t used for bait, pruned trees and, trained…

View original post 488 more words

Advertisements

I Have Not Forgotten How to Write

A companion post to I Have Not Forgotten How to Fight

The last year and a half has been a challenging one. I’ve been busy with medical relief mission work, as well as with academic and research writing. With three major presentations coming up in Fall 2018, and being on call for an upcoming mission to the Souther Border of the US, my mind has very focused on real life.

In my last blog, I spoke about how switching genres had helped me overcome a stubborn case of writer’s block after Storm Watch, the third and final book in the Unfinished Business Series was published in July 2017. I hadn’t made any progress on my urban fantasy novel  since NaNoWriMo, but was bitten by a bug during a recent vacation in California. I’ve now got 20,000 words of a Contemporary Western Romance written, and I’m waking up in the middle of the night to jot down scenes. I’ve got a…

View original post 535 more words

Gallery

The Words Didn’t Flow, So I Switched Genres

It wasn’t easy to finish Storm Watch, which completed the Unfinished Business paranormal series. The novel was essentially done and just needed editing. Or so I thought. I realized the pacing was off and some scenes were not fully developed. It was a struggle to stay focused and progress was very slow. At one point, I believed it would be my last novel, but working with Laurie Sanders, a truly wonderful developmental editor, kept me going until I got enough momentum to get to The End.

True, I was bogged down with the ever challenging day job and family issues, but that had never stopped me from writing before. In fact, writing helped me get through some tough times because I could immerse myself in a make believe world instead of languish in the real one.  I thought it was because I was writing the last book in the series…

View original post 1,117 more words

Writer’s Block or Creative Hibernation? Part Two: Get Out of the House

Today I’m picking up where I left off on Writer’s Block or Creative Hibernation Part One, which I can now subtitle, “When Life Intrudes.” The vast majority of authors I know have day jobs–and families (which may include older parents and usually includes pets). That means we’re on duty 24 hours a day, seven days a week. And that means we have to carve out writing time when we should be doing something else. Like sleeping and eating.

We make the transition between the three jobs look easy, by sticking to a routine. But when the inevitable emergency or necessary distractions like vacations, holidays, birthdays or other family events intrude, our discipline relaxes and may wane as we fight to keep our heads above water.

I had forgotten that as I struggled to finish Storm Watch and get it launched last December. I considered the 20,000 words of my new…

View original post 273 more words

Gallery

Writer’s Block Or Creative Hibernation?

I haven’t written anything substantial since NaNoWriMo ended-fiction wise or otherwise. Part of the problem was planning for deployment to Puerto Rico on a medical mission, which required a lot of energy and planning for what was a real life disaster as opposed to plotting a fictional one. It was a little spooky that Hurricane Maria was a “high end” Category 4 storm, like Hurricane Edward in Storm Watch. But while I do believe in synchrony, the novel was written over a year ago, inspired by real life experiences. Politics aside, the frightening escalations in the severity of storms over the past few years came home to roost when Hurricanes Irene and Sandy ( both Category 3 storms) hit New York City and had us on our backs for about a month each. That, and my childhood experiences with hurricanes,  were the fiction fodder for Storm Watch.

Natural disasters…

View original post 606 more words

FACT AND FICTION INTERSECT: AGAIN

Fact and fiction intersect. I am participating in National Novel Writing Month. Boulevard of Bad Spells and Broken Dreams is set in The Bronx–and in Puerto Rico. The genre is urban fantasy, which adds magic and supernatural elements to modern urban settings. Odd coincidence that I am now awaiting word of deployment on a medical relief mission to the devastated Isla Encantada.  Ethnographic research is the fancy term for boots on the ground. And mine are about to get down and dirty.

Here’s what I came up with for a pivotal scene in the novel. It might be cut, or edited, but once again, I’m immersing myself in fact to write fiction.

Humans are very stupid, and we have some very stupid and immoral specimens in power now. You are only one of the leaders with the power to incite others to join with you–each has his or own area to control. This island will rebound, become lush and green and joyful again. Listen, hear the music already? You are una boriqueña, you know what it means to love the ground you walk on, the air you breathe, the calls of el coquí, the kiss of the blue waters and white sands on your skin. It takes more courage to leave than to stay–but you did will fight from afar for La Isla. Las caracoles have spoken, and it will come to pass.  

©Carole Ann Moleti, 2017

El Yunque when I visited in 2013

El Yunque after Hurricane Maria  

NaNoWriMo 2017-Fantasy and Real Life Collide

Once again, I find myself in the middle of NaNoWriMo, and was keeping up with writing every day when real life intruded. I got my start writing creative nonfiction trying to make sense of and add perspective to my real life experiences. But it got so hard to keep running into walls, and writing speculative fiction lets me walk through them, which is a lot less painful.

I begin weekdays with a five thirty am alarm, a hellish commute, and days full of heartbreaking tales of neglect, poverty, trauma and the aftermath. I love my work,  but after eight to twelve hours, five days a week, doing anything but collapsing when I get home is usually impossible. NaNoWriMo has always been helpful to make progress on stalled projects. And this one, a gritty urban fantasy set in the South Bronx with Puerto Rican characters, fell way behind schedule while I…

View original post 498 more words